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Posts Tagged ‘dark and stormy night’

Snoopy’s Great American Novel Inspires: Comicbook Legend Revealed

In Uncategorized on August 22, 2012 at 8:15 AM

I’m so grateful for stumbling upon this because I didn’t know what to write for today’s drabble.

Over at ComicBookResources.com, there’s a series called “Comic Legends Revealed”. The second legend revealed in their 273rd post is:`

COMIC LEGEND: Len Wein came up with an amusing tribute to Snoopy’s Great American Novel in a Batman short story he did with Walt Simonson.

STATUS: True

“It was a dark and stormy night” first appeared at the beginning of novelist Edward Bulwer-Lytton’s 1830 novel, Paul Clifford. It has become one of the most famous example of “purple prose” ever.

In July of 1965, Charlie Brown’s dog, Snoopy, first began working on his novel, and sure enough, the phrase opened his work.

Check out the rest of the post, complete with both Snoopy’s Great American Novel and the Batman short it inspired.

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Tremble (August 30-Day Writing Contest)

In Fiction on August 22, 2012 at 6:36 AM

(18th in this challenge)

(inspired by the Bulwer-Lytton Fiction Contest and my scriptophobia)

It was a dark and stormy night. I retrieved a defrosting fish stick from its box, used it to snoop the richness of the black pit of cocoa I’d made to submissify my nerves as dry wall sections of rain slammed into the windows. The glass trembled like an innocent girl being slapped around by her tyrannical, widowed farmer father who didn’t have a cow or horse or sheep to ride into town on (or sleigh, which is more suitable for winter in the geography of this story) so that he could buy himself some more Coca-Cola Zero (though he owned a viciously purple bicycle that was like a brother to him even though he’d been paraplegic since birth so it was more like a taunting brother, as useful as three strips of thin-ply toilet paper in a roofless outhouse in the middle of a high, naked meadow on this dark and stormy night at the penultimate instance of flood).    Read the rest of this entry »